Graves of a British Couple Murdered found in Guatemala

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Photo: PENNY FARMER
Photo: PENNY FARMER

Graves of a British couple who were found murdered and tied to engine parts in Guatemala, were finally located after all these years. Penny Farmer, the sister of Chris Farmer, along with 5 journalists found new evidences on the missing graves of her brother and Peta Frampton. The families of both the victims were told that their remains have been lost and a letter and two pictures were taken in 1984 were the only clues to their location.

The couple last communicated to their families that they were travelling on a boat, which was owned by, Silas Duane Boston. After a lot of investigation and back and forth of the clues found by the FBI, Silas Duane Boston who was from California was charged for their murder. Unfortunately, he died before the trial could reach its verdict.

The couple’s graves were not located back then, after repetitive searches done by the FBI in the Puerto Barrios cemetery, where the couple was known to be buried. Back in 1984, the only person to visit the graves of the couple was pastor Garry McClure, who took the photos of the cement crosses. In a BBC podcast Paradise, he traced back and shared some new information on the case which led Penny Farmer, sister of the male victim and 5 other journalists to the Puerto Barrios cemetery.

She described the cemetery and said, “It was far more shambolic than I ever appreciated.” She said the FBI was correct in saying that the cemetery was chaotic. After an hour of searching, they finally found both the cement crosses hidden behind leaves. “I didn’t realise how important it was until I was there standing by his graveside, that was actually quite emotional,” said Miss Farmer.

The efforts of the FBI are being questioned here, the journalists said that they found the graves with the help of the directions of the pastor and evidences of his letter in less than an hour. The trial could have been speeded if the FBI would have located the graves earlier. SSA David Sesma, the FBI officer who led the investigation defended his officers and told the journalists and the Farmer and Frampton family that they did their best to reach justice and find evidences during the case.